Clinuvel

When do you think Clinuvel will have a new all time high? (Go over $45 AUD)

  • 2023 1st Half

  • 2023 2nd Half

  • 2024

  • 2025


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killipso35

Well-known member
The OTC product renders immediately reminded me of every shiny duty free shop I've been forced to navigate through in so many modern international airports. (My wife always gives me a list of special skin-care products to purchase when I'm away on business, but when I see the prices, I often "forget" to buy them... :))

My bet is that this environment will be where we experience the OTC products for the first time; while milling around in the duty free shop trying not to be suckered into buying a new watch, perfume, or (more likely) some more of that 18 yo scotch whiskey.

There will be a huge glowing sign with a very attractive and scantily clad influencer, that you cannot help stare at for a few seconds, just long enough to drink in the perfect healthy looking skin on the clearly middle-aged but youthful looking face, while also having the Clinuvel logo subconsciously tattooed into your brain.

Then you will experience the same image in your in-flight magazine, at the start of your in-flight movie. If you have a spare penny (which you do because you are flying around in business class), you will buy some of this stuff, and it will be EXPENSIVE.
 

Clinhope

Well-known member
@killipso35 If that's what they go for it doesn't really follow their mantra of treating those in need.
In my opinion they need to find a balance where they are "premium" looking products, obviously unrivalled in their beneficial effects, but at a price that a large percentage of middle income households can afford.

Especially if we want kids, mum, dad and grandparents benefitting from this technology I'm hoping the products are more aligned with the Ordinary brand than Chanels premium products at a few hundred dollars.

Sunscreens: ~$70
DNA Repair products : ~$100 - $150
Vitiligo products: $50 - $100

I think any higher than that and you start losing a large amount of customers who might afford it once or twice but not multiple times a year for multiple people in a household, for an endless number of years.
 
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Sherlock

Well-known member
@killipso35 If that's what they go for it doesn't really follow their mantra of treating those in need.
In my opinion they need to find a balance where they are "premium" looking products, obviously unrivalled in their beneficial effects, but at a price that a large percentage of middle income households can afford.

Especially if we want kids, mum, dad and grandparents benefitting from this technology I'm hoping the products are more aligned with the Ordinary brand than Chanels premium products at a few hundred dollars.

Sunscreens: ~$70
DNA Repair products : ~$100 - $150
Vitiligo products: $50 - $100

I think any higher than that and you start losing a large amount of customers who might afford it once or twice but not multiple times a year for multiple people in a household, for an endless number of years.
The question then becomes can they deliver the quantities needed? Going for expensive retail in the short term gives them cashflow, while limiting demand, which you can use to upscale production. At this point you make it 'everywhere' accessible. However, that implies somewhere down the road you will make your 'exclusively available' less exclusively; downscaling the brand. I agree with you, and in essence this will have the potential of becoming aspirin, but you can't produce these quantities single handed. So you'll have to make choices: investing heavily with no income to make it everywhere accessible and hope for the best or dripping it into the market while trying to open the faucet as fast as you can while asking a premium for those with no desire to wait for the lower pricing.

Spoiler: it'll be option 2.
 
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investek

Well-known member
It’s interesting that Wolgen says once you get the first results from XP, then you should start marketing the OTCs. I’ve posted previously that I believe the AK/OTR trial could be just as compelling if not more (esp. if they continued the trial past two years).

But thinking out loud, if you have topical Rx products in the pipeline and you intend to release OTC products that have a similar effect, i.e. locoregional melanogenesis and/or DNA repair, wouldn’t it make sense to get those products approved/in use before trying to sell the OTCs? Wouldn’t that lend the most credibility? We’ve waited over 10yrs for CUV9900 from memory…

What am I missing? (See the bottom section of the graphic below)

Recall this graphic followed the section entitled ‘Pharmaceuticals

6608898B-DEF6-42BD-AAE8-13EE46CE8D28.jpeg
 

killipso35

Well-known member
@Sherlock yep. Standard go to market strategy for shiny new things that are initially in short supply and need to make money, allowing for production scale to ramp, while establishing (or reaffirming) brand recognition. Telsa model S is a good example. Expensive sports car. Makes a splash, defines the brand, expensive but high margin, manufacturing volume can be managed. Then sell everyone a model 3 or Y. Same approach for Clinvel. Eventually it will appear in your local chemist or supermarket but only after the consumer desire has been manufactured and the factory is ready to pump it out in volume.
 

endymion96

2nd Longest Active Member
@seeva222 Unfortunately Palatin has not moved the needle in regards to their SP. So I ask myself, what is it going to take to do this in today's market climate? An approved drug for a new indication that actually earns revenue for the company? Is that when the big fish and the sheeple will pile in? If so, we will be stuck like this for years now. What happened to the days when investers would invest in companies with a promising although not completely derisked future? Are they that scared? Or is it something else? If something else, it can only be that nobody knows about the company or what it is doing. Right? Are there other explanations? This is just a general observation ...
 

Klomp

3rd Longest Active Member
@endymion96 I think CUV think long term. There is lots of negative brand equity around Melanotan. CUV need to break the nexus with a highly authentic, specialised, serious medicinal OTC. It will be pitched as a premium product specialised for those most in need. Those most in need....who derive the highest benefit...will be asked to pay a premium price. There will be no mention of tanning IMO.
I'd expect long term pricing to becoming more accessible, once branding and positioning is established.
 
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